20 must-try restaurants in Chinatown, Boston



Restaurants

Find dumplings, noodles, roast duck, and more in one of the most delicious pockets of the city.

Lamb plate at Gourmet Dumpling House in Boston
Lamb plate at Gourmet Dumpling House in Boston. Aram Boghosian for The Boston Globe

To say that Boston’s vibrant, ever-changing Chinatown has experienced hardships in the past couple of years is an understatement. In the early months of the pandemic, the neighborhood was the first to experience a rapid decline in clientele. Chinatown’s narrow streets prevented it from taking advantage of outdoor dining in a way that other neighborhoods had been able to, and a series of closures, including New Saigon Sandwich and China King, have considerably changed its landscape.

But the neighborhood is also incredibly resilient, and some of the city’s best meals can still be had here, at restaurants that shine a spotlight on fiery Szechuan noodles, sushi, hot pot, dim sum, bánh mì, pho, and more. Craving

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Restaurant Review: Cha Kee in Manhattan’s Chinatown

All good New Yorkers know that Lower Manhattan would lose a piece of its identity if Chinese businesses disappeared from Chinatown. In Little Italy, when the Italian Americans moved away, real estate brokers scrubbed one part of the area of its ethnic identity by renaming it NoLIta. If this tactic is successful a few blocks south, we could see apartment listings on Doyers and Pell Streets advertising their prime location in the heart of SoChiTo.

Walk around the neighborhood on any given day, and this scenario won’t seem as far-fetched as it should be. Chinatown started to empty out almost two years ago, when Covid-19 was still a rumor in New York City but a poisonous anti-Asian mood was rising, and it is still not packed the way it used to be. The tourists the area depends on still haven’t returned in force. And for the past few years,

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88 Marketplace is an Asian food wonderland hidden just west of Chinatown

Just west of Chinatown, the historic neighborhood on the South Side of Chicago, a strangely shiny building has landed along a row of old brick warehouses.

Jefferson Square takes its name from the building’s street address. Technically it stands in East Pilsen. To the outsider, little reveals that the glass-fronted facade hides an Asian food wonderland, with what’s touted as the largest Chinese supermarket in the city.

88 Marketplace sprawls across the second floor of the cavernous center. When the store celebrated its grand opening last year on the auspicious date of Aug. 28 (eight is a lucky number in Chinese culture), the food court mostly had yet to open. Shoppers indulged instead in the delights of imported Lay’s potato chips, exotic fruit and live seafood.

New Chan, a real estate development company based in McKinley Park, owns the building, market and parking lots across the street. Unlike H Mart,

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The Chef Who Led a Global Dining Empire Sets Out on His Own in San Francisco’s Chinatown

Before it became known as a nightlife brand associated with globetrotting DJs and elaborate bottle-service presentations, Hakkasan was a global pioneer of contemporary Asian food. Ho Chee Boon, who was Hakkasan’s international executive chef, opened restaurants for the high-end hospitality group in London, Moscow, Bangkok, New York, San Francisco and beyond. Under Ho’s leadership, Hakkasan restaurants earned Michelin stars in both London and New York.

Now in 2021, a year that’s seen hospitality behemoth Tao Group acquire Hakkasan (which closed its New York and San Francisco restaurants in 2020), the Malaysian-born Ho is writing his own path at a new buzzworthy restaurant in San Francisco. On June 18, Ho will open Empress by Boon with modern Cantonese food at the former location of Chinatown’s iconic Empress of China restaurant.

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