Dollar General’s healthy food partnership with Baton Rouge spotlighted

In its newly released 2020 Best Practices Report, The U.S. Conference of Mayors highlighted Dollar General’s role in helping to increase fresh produce and access to healthier food in Baton Rouge as an example of an innovative public-private partnership addressing an economic challenge communities across the country are facing.

Specifically, the report—produced annually by the U.S. Conference of Mayors’ Business Council—detailed how Dollar General partnered with Mayor Sharon Weston Broome to bring healthier food options to two remodeled stores in communities without a nearby grocery store. 

Dollar General’s curated assortment provides fresh fruits and vegetables including lettuce, tomatoes, onions, apples, strawberries, potatoes, sweet potatoes, lemons, limes, salad mixes and more. The produce set offers the top 20 items typically sold in traditional grocery stores and covers approximately 80% of produce categories most stores carry.

Additionally, the report mentions how the chain was able to partner with the American Heart

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Rocky River’s Go Buddha offers first healthy food ATM in Cleveland area

ROCKY RIVER, Ohio — Go Buddha opened its food delivery service in Rocky River last July and is finding the city to be a friendly place. Maybe that’s because the chef really knows food –healthy food — and apparently that is being appreciated.

But now he is going even further, offering the Cleveland area’s very first ATM food service at the west-side restaurant. But let’s step back for a moment.

Chef and owner Joshua Ingraham and his wife, Emily, started the business in October 2019. Ingraham was the former executive chef for the Cleveland Indians and, prior to that, was the culinary director at the Cleveland Clinic.

“We started our restaurant as a sideline,” Ingraham said. “I always wanted to pair food and health. I had to learn plant-based food prep and wanted to go back to the root of simplicity in food. Whether vegan or not, we can all

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Warner bill expanding access to healthy foods could be oasis in Petersburg’s food deserts



a sign in front of a building: This Food Lion, located on the site of the old Walnut Mall in Petersburg, is one of two national grocery chains — the other being Walmart — located within the Petersburg city limits. A bill from Sen. Mark R. Warner, D-Virginia, would establish financial incentives for food providers to build and expand operations in so-called 'food deserts.'


© Photo from Yelp.com
This Food Lion, located on the site of the old Walnut Mall in Petersburg, is one of two national grocery chains — the other being Walmart — located within the Petersburg city limits. A bill from Sen. Mark R. Warner, D-Virginia, would establish financial incentives for food providers to build and expand operations in so-called ‘food deserts.’

U.S. Sen. Mark R. Warner is the chief patron of bipartisan legislation that creates incentives to increase access to groceries in underserved communities — including Petersburg — commonly referred to as “food deserts” due to their lack of adequate numbers of supermarkets within them.

The bipartisan Healthy Food Access for All Americans (HFAAA) Act, introduced Wednesday in the Senate by Warner, D-Virginia, and three other senators, would create tax credits and onetime grants for entities to establish and expand operations that make it easier to get nutritious foods

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Denver program to swap cops for health workers “saves lives,” police say

A program that replaces police officers with health care workers on mental health and substance abuse calls in Denver, Colorado, is showing signs of success, according to a six-month progress report. Despite responding to hundreds of calls, the workers made no arrests, the report said — and the city’s police chief told CBS News on Friday that he believes the program “saves lives.” 



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© Denver Police Department
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Under the Support Team Assisted Response (STAR) program, health care workers are dispatched in lieu of police when responding to incidents involving issues with mental health, poverty, homelessness or substance abuse. STAR providers only respond to incidents in which there is no evidence of criminal activity, disturbance, weapons, threats, violence, injuries or “serious” medical needs. 

During the first six months of the program, from June 1 to November 30, health professionals responded to 748 calls, including trespassing, welfare checks, narcotic

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