Sharing Chinese Herbal Soups and Teas, Steeped in Tradition

This story is part of Best Health’s Preservation series, which spotlights wellness businesses and practices rooted in culture, community and history. 



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© Image: kyth + kyn founder Vivian Man


Vivian Man grew up in Hong Kong and in her home, Chinese broths, herbal soups and dessert soups were frequently on the menu. The recipes, often made by her mother or grandparents, changed with the seasons. In the summer, aunties came over with bottles of chrysanthemum tea with goji berries, ingredients for cooling teas that help combat internal heat. In the winter months, there would be ginseng and warming herbs, mixes to help boost the immune system.

Man’s family moved from Hong Kong to Canada when she was seven and eventually she began learning to make her mom’s healing soups at their home in Vancouver. These herbal recipes played a huge role in Man’s family’s health and wellbeing, and as

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The tasty tradition of Taiwan’s midnight meals

The tasty tradition of Taiwan’s midnight meals

(Image credit: Boaz Rottem/Alamy)

Stinky tofu is a popular option for ‘xiaoye’, or the midnight snack, in Taiwan (Credit: Boaz Rottem/Alamy)

While most countries only have three meals a day, Taiwan worships food so much that there’s a fourth and final meal: the midnight snack, or ‘xiaoye’ in Chinese.

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It was dark and sopping wet at the Ningxia Night Market in Taipei, Taiwan. Yet even as the rain continued to seep into my socks, the narrow alleys were still jam-packed with people, elbow to elbow.

They were jostling to place their order at Li Zhang Bo, a small stinky tofu stall run by Yiwen Wang and Qirong Li, Taiwan’s self-described queen and king of stink. Their signature dish – deep-fried fermented tofu on a bed of pickled vegetables – would make even the most pungent locker room smell like roses. But still, the line of loyal customers threaded around the block, stretching as far as the nose-wrinkling

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Boston has a long tradition of Asian women chefs and restaurateurs. Here are eight standout businesses to support

Neither has its restaurant community. Asia Mei, chef-owner of Moonshine 152 in South Boston, says she felt the climate grow more threatening last year around St. Patrick’s Day. “We were starting to get a lot of racist, threatening, xenophobic calls; [comments on] Facebook and community bulletin boards; things from strangers; things from people honestly you would have never thought would have said something like that. At the base of my heart, I know it’s fear and misunderstanding. I can take it because I’m tough, but at the same time, it doesn’t make it right,” she says. “It seems shocking that we aren’t more vigilant of how to empathize with each other, how to look out for each other.”

Mei is part of a long tradition of strong, successful Asian women chefs and restaurateurs in the Boston area, dating back at least as far as 1958, when Joyce Chen served Peking

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Denver’s Meta Asian Kitchen celebrates tradition with food

Every order comes with Chinese red envelopes. Some will have $2 and others will have golden tickets that can be redeemed for a free entree.

DENVER — We’re in the middle of Chinese New Year and as we welcome in The Year of the Ox, we’re sharing how a husband and wife team is sharing their favorite traditions and hoping to bring a little luck into this new year.

“Chinese New Year is one of my favorite holidays,” said Doris Yuen, one of the owners of Meta Asian Kitchen in Denver.

For Yuen and her husband, Ken Wan, this time of year carries many different traditions.

“I would eat a lot during Chinese new year growing up,” said Wan.

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And as the owners of Meta Asian Kitchen, it’s no surprise a lot of those are centered around food.

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