Best Chinese restaurants in Charlotte, recommended by foodies, restaurateurs and readers

We suspect you usually end up eating most of your Chinese food after a Google search for “nearest Chinese restaurant to me” in Charlotte, and there’s nothing wrong with that. But sometimes you’re in the mood to step out of that comfort zone and try something beyond your standard Sesame Chicken order.

To help you out, we dug around in our archives and asked our foodie friends, a few restaurant experts and CharlotteFive readers for recommendations. What we came up with are a few restaurants that offer a more authentic taste of Chinese flavors and fun dishes you probably won’t find anywhere else, along with some familiar Chinese American favorites.

Here are some of the best Chinese restaurants to try in the Charlotte area:

Asian Grill

Location: 3913 Providence Road South, Waxhaw, NC 28173

Neighborhood: Waxhaw

Menu

What to try: The lunch offerings include a rice bowl special with a

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Restaurateurs discuss criticism of Hot Crispy Oil and culinary appropriation

When John Trimble launched Hot Crispy Oil last year, he did not anticipate the condiment would make a splash in all the ways it did.

After the Times Union published a story in July on Hot Crispy Oil and Trimble’s turn from closing La Serre, his family’s 43-year-old French restaurant in downtown Albany, to starting a condiment business, sales for Hot Crispy Oil soared. The blend of oil with spices and hot peppers has sold 50,000 jars since its launch last summer.

Criticism that Trimble, a white man, was stealing ideas from Chinese culture rose, too. A letter to the editor that appeared in the Times Union said Trimble’s product, and the way he described it, appropriated a traditional Chinese chile oil by taking the idea and commercializing it for profit without crediting the Asian culture that the oil derives from.

Attacks on Hot Crispy Oil were rampant on

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Boston has a long tradition of Asian women chefs and restaurateurs. Here are eight standout businesses to support

Neither has its restaurant community. Asia Mei, chef-owner of Moonshine 152 in South Boston, says she felt the climate grow more threatening last year around St. Patrick’s Day. “We were starting to get a lot of racist, threatening, xenophobic calls; [comments on] Facebook and community bulletin boards; things from strangers; things from people honestly you would have never thought would have said something like that. At the base of my heart, I know it’s fear and misunderstanding. I can take it because I’m tough, but at the same time, it doesn’t make it right,” she says. “It seems shocking that we aren’t more vigilant of how to empathize with each other, how to look out for each other.”

Mei is part of a long tradition of strong, successful Asian women chefs and restaurateurs in the Boston area, dating back at least as far as 1958, when Joyce Chen served Peking

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A Chat With Food Critics, Chefs And Restaurateurs From Asia

I gather my friends – Asian food writers, food critics, restaurateurs and chefs – asking them why they think Chinese food comes with such a bad reputation – ultimately being the poster child of ‘dirty’.

With hundreds of Chinese restaurants closed in this pandemic year, perhaps it is more timely than ever to ask the question – can Chinese food ever be seen as ‘fine-dining’ and will America lose its love/hate relationship with Chinese food with all these closures?

Let’s not forget Chinese-American cuisine is very much a part of the American culture as is BBQ to Southerners and bagels to New Yorkers Chinese Food is definitely a highly lucrative industry. 

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