restaurants

Outdoor dining, heat lamps: Restaurants survive COVID-19

Tamara Holmes, Special to USA TODAY
Published 5:00 a.m. ET Oct. 5, 2020 | Updated 10:27 a.m. ET Oct. 5, 2020

In a year when thousands of restaurants have closed and many more are struggling to hang on, Bar Bombón in Philadelphia currently is enjoying sales 5% to 10% above last year’s levels. 

It’s a far cry from March when the mayor said all restaurants had to close to slow the spread of COVID-19.

“It was like a gauntlet came down,” says Bar Bombón owner Nicole Marquis recalling the announcement. Her full-service vegan restaurant offers plant-based Latin American favorites such as tacos and empanadas.

With Bar Bombón restricted to takeout and delivery orders, sales fell by the end of March to 10% of normal revenue levels. Yet, remarkably the restaurant is currently exceeding last year’s revenue, despite the fact that indoor dining just began in Philadelphia at 25% capacity in

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Why Big Delivery Apps Are Bad For Small Restaurants

(Photo: ILLUSTRATION: YENWEI LIU/HUFFPOST; PHOTO: COURTESY OF LINXIN WEN)
(Photo: ILLUSTRATION: YENWEI LIU/HUFFPOST; PHOTO: COURTESY OF LINXIN WEN)

Linxin Wen — the 29-year-old CEO and co-founder of Chowbus, a delivery app that specializes in high-quality Asian cuisine — is intent on providing customers with access to authentic Asian food, and helping mom-and-pop shops break through a system designed to benefit larger chain restaurants. Chowbus does this by providing “dish-focused” delivery service from independent Asian eateries that might not garner much attention on the likes of GrubHub and UberEats. The perspective of Wen — himself an immigrant who moved to the United States seven years ago — is unique, as seen through the prism of this Voices in Food story, told to Anna Rahmanan

Most Americans who aren’t interested in authentic Asian food aren’t interested only because they don’t know about it. That’s why so many Asian restaurants have a separate menu they give Americans, featuring non-traditional dishes

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Chicago’s Chinatown restaurants reopen slowly as fear of the coronavirus still lingers

Chinatown in Chicago was hit first and hard by the coronavirus. Not so much by the virus itself, but fear of the unknown. Masks had sold out and Lunar New Year events were already canceled by the time the first confirmed case of COVID-19 in the city was announced on Jan. 24. Data now shows confirmed cases have remained relatively low in the Chinatown area compared with ZIP codes with the highest numbers in Chicago.

Business has still dropped dramatically. Most restaurants have tried to stay open — some never stopped serving bubble tea, bao and dumplings for takeout and delivery. The few bars — all karaoke — went dark until recently. Less than half of the restaurants have reopened for indoor dining and hardly any have room for outdoor dining.

As restaurants and bars across the city reopened indoor service four weeks ago, Chinatown has remained cautious. Owners, employees

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The fine dining restaurants now delivering food

Restaurants and the hospitality industry have been hit hard by lockdown measures, and many have introduced delivery services to help them survive.

Let’s face it, we’re all getting tired of our own cooking after ten weeks into being stuck at home, and a takeaway satisfies our cravings for flavoursome food from our favourite eateries.

Some, such a Patty & Bun and Pizza Pilgrims, have created DIY kits to allow you to recreate dishes in your kitchen.

However, if you’re feeling lazy or simply looking for a fine dining experience from a more upmarket restaurant, many have now started doing food delivery or collection. You may have even planned to visit before lockdown scuppered your plans, so now is your chance to enjoy it from home.

It’s perfect for date nights and celebrating special occasions like a birthday or anniversary.

From across the UK, ahead are eight places we can’t wait

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