Food from everywhere, and nowhere [restaurant review]



 Richard Foss

Chin Chin offers an American vision of Asian flavors

Chin Chin manager George Armenta with his popular Chinese chicken salad. Photos by JP Codero

Before naming any business, you probably ought to investigate what it means in different languages. Chin Chin on Rosecrans is an example. In diplomatic English it’s slang for small talk at parties, in Italian it’s a toast celebrating health, in Nigeria it’s a kind of fried cookie, and in Japan it is a euphemism for “a personal part of the male anatomy.” Depending on the Chinese dialect and the way it is accented, it can be anything from “please” to a polite greeting to complete gibberish.

I have to assume that the restaurant was named after one of the Chinese meanings, though they refer to their style as “Asian,” and offer sushi as well as

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50 Largest Restaurant Chains in America

Some of the most popular restaurant chains in the country aren’t the most successful. While customers may report how much they like (or dislike) a restaurant on surveys, the true way to tell whether a restaurant is popular or not is to look at where those customers put their money—not where they put their mouth.

That’s why we consulted Nation’s Restaurant News’ 2020 Top 200 report on the top 50 chains with the highest systemwide total sales to determine the largest popular restaurant chains in America. Every year, NRN compiles the data for this report to reveal an “in-depth look at the health of the industry and the performance of its biggest players.”

Our list—ranked from lowest to highest in sales—is made up of popular restaurant chains with many locations nationwide (like Chick-fil-A, Burger King, and McDonald’s) as well as regional restaurant chains (like Culver’s

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Restaurant chain in China apologizes for suggesting menu items based on customer weight

A Chinese food buffet. 

<p class=Mike Kemp/In PIctures via Getty Images

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A Chinese food buffet.
  • A chain restaurant in China apologized for weighing customers for food recommendations, CNN reported.

  • The popular Hunan chain Chuiyan Fried Beef asked customers to step on a scale to weigh themselves so that a guide could recommend dishes based on their weight. 

  • In efforts to build food security and reduce food waste, Chinese President Xi Jinping emphasized that fostering “a social environment where waste is shameful and thriftiness is applaudable,” state-run media reported.

  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

A restaurant chain in China publicly apologized for weighing customers to give them menu recommendations before entering the restaurant, CNN reported.

Chulyan Fried Beef, a popular chain based in Hunan, asked customers to step on scales so that they could weigh themselves before entering the restaurant. Based

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China restaurant apologises for weighing customers

Hashtags about the restaurant have been viewed more than 300 million times on Weibo
Hashtags about the restaurant have been viewed more than 300 million times on Weibo

A restaurant in central China has apologised for encouraging diners to weigh themselves and then order food accordingly.

The policy was introduced after a national campaign against food waste was launched.

The beef restaurant in the city of Changsha placed two large scales at its entrance this week.

It then asked diners to enter their measurements into an app that would then suggest menu items accordingly.

Signs reading “be thrifty and diligent, promote empty plates” and “operation empty plate” were pinned up.

The policy caused uproar on Chinese social media.

Hashtags about the restaurant have been viewed more than 300 million times on the social platform Weibo.

The restaurant said it was “deeply sorry” for its interpretation of the national “Clean Plate Campaign”.

“Our original intentions were to advocate stopping waste and ordering food in a

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