Health

Denver program to swap cops for health workers “saves lives,” police say

A program that replaces police officers with health care workers on mental health and substance abuse calls in Denver, Colorado, is showing signs of success, according to a six-month progress report. Despite responding to hundreds of calls, the workers made no arrests, the report said — and the city’s police chief told CBS News on Friday that he believes the program “saves lives.” 



a group of people looking at a cell phone: img-5580.jpg


© Denver Police Department
img-5580.jpg

Under the Support Team Assisted Response (STAR) program, health care workers are dispatched in lieu of police when responding to incidents involving issues with mental health, poverty, homelessness or substance abuse. STAR providers only respond to incidents in which there is no evidence of criminal activity, disturbance, weapons, threats, violence, injuries or “serious” medical needs. 

During the first six months of the program, from June 1 to November 30, health professionals responded to 748 calls, including trespassing, welfare checks, narcotic

Read More

Health Watch: Food poisoning

RAPID CITY, S.D. (KEVN) -This is Dr. Larson at Creekside Medical Clinic. the Superbowl is this weekend and with the big game comes the big game meals and snacks but those snacks can lead to food poisoning when they become contaminated typically with disease-causing bacteria. The CDC estimates that 48 million get sick, 128 thousand get hospitalized, and three thousand people pass away each year from food poisoning. They recommend 4 basic steps to keep yourself and your family safe when chowing down during the big game. Number 1 wash your cutting board, counters, and knives with hot soapy water and wash your hands between each food item. Number 2 keep your raw fruits and veggies separate from your meats including using separate cutting boards. Number 3, cook your meat to safe temperatures, fish to 145 degrees, beef and pork to 145 degrees, ground beef and pork to 165 degrees,

Read More

I Use My Food Stamps at the Health Food Store & the Shaming Needs to Stop

I was at a community gathering when I heard someone speak out in criticism of using food stamps—aka Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) benefits—to buy healthful food. Unfortunately, it wasn’t the first time, and it won’t be the last.



diagram: Getty Images / Design: Jo Imperio


© Provided by Health
Getty Images / Design: Jo Imperio

“My wife used to work at the health food store,” I overheard a police officer saying. “She used to tell me about all the people who used food stamps there.” His tone was dismissive; clearly, he did not consider that I or anyone else in the room might be a SNAP recipient. But I was. I am.

He continued, “There’s a problem with the system when we’re supporting people to buy expensive food.”

Of course, exactly how SNAP recipients choose to—and are permitted to—use the safety net that food stamps provide has been a source of contention for decades. Back

Read More

Insurers add food to coverage menu as way to improve health

When COVID-19 first swarmed the United States, one health insurer called some customers with a question: Do you have enough to eat?



Chef Jermaine Wall stacks containers of soups at Community Servings, which prepares and delivers scratch-made, medically tailored meals to individuals & families living with critical & chronic illnesses, Tuesday, Jan. 12, 2021, in the Jamaica Plain neighborhood of Boston. Food is a growing focus for insurers as they look to improve the health of the people they cover and cut costs. Insurers first started covering Community Servings meals about five years ago, and CEO David Waters says they now cover close to 40%. (AP Photo/Charles Krupa)


© Provided by Associated Press
Chef Jermaine Wall stacks containers of soups at Community Servings, which prepares and delivers scratch-made, medically tailored meals to individuals & families living with critical & chronic illnesses, Tuesday, Jan. 12, 2021, in the Jamaica Plain neighborhood of Boston. Food is a growing focus for insurers as they look to improve the health of the people they cover and cut costs. Insurers first started covering Community Servings meals about five years ago, and CEO David Waters says they now cover close to 40%. (AP Photo/Charles Krupa)

Oscar Health wanted to know if people had adequate food for the next couple weeks and how they planned to stay stocked up while hunkering down at home.

“We’ve seen time and again, the lack of good

Read More