American Chinese food is the best American comfort food. These 10 spots prove why.

This is a love letter to the restaurants with sprawling, triple-digit-count menus that serve up wire-handled cartons of General Tso’s chicken or beef and broccoli, the results of immigrant ingenuity melding with American tastes. Think of the varied combinations of rice or noodles and proteins swimming in mother sauces including dark, silken oyster and syrupy orange and red — you probably have your own favorite that hits a specific kind of nostalgic feeling.

In an era during which most restaurants are revamping their operations for carryout, Chinese takeout remains a surefire neighborhood staple, which made it all the more fun for chef Tim Ma to research when he was prepping to open his latest restaurant, Lucky Danger, an American Chinese pop-up in his currently dormant Prather’s on the Alley in Mount Vernon Triangle.

Ma, a Chinese American who fondly recalls his uncle’s Chinese restaurant in Yorktown Heights, N.Y., as

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Genevieve Ko talks dim sum and Mexican food in the San Gabriel Valley

I became a fan of Genevieve Ko a few years ago when I received a copy of her 2016 baking masterwork, “Better Baking,” as a holiday gift.

I learned many important lessons from that book — the value of investing in a good rimmed baking sheet, for one — and return often to its simple yet profound premise, which is rooted in the idea that minimally processed ingredients, used intelligently, can deepen the flavor of something as familiar as a peanut butter cookie, and make you long for a chocolate sheet cake made using, of all things, creamy sweet potatoes.

Before joining L.A. Times Food as cooking editor nearly two years ago, Genevieve worked as an editor at Martha Stewart Living and Gourmet, among other publications, and has co-authored several well-known cookbooks, including George Mendes’ “My Portugal,” Carla Hall’s “Soul Food” and multiple titles with French American chef

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Food from everywhere, and nowhere [restaurant review]



 Richard Foss

Chin Chin offers an American vision of Asian flavors

Chin Chin manager George Armenta with his popular Chinese chicken salad. Photos by JP Codero

Before naming any business, you probably ought to investigate what it means in different languages. Chin Chin on Rosecrans is an example. In diplomatic English it’s slang for small talk at parties, in Italian it’s a toast celebrating health, in Nigeria it’s a kind of fried cookie, and in Japan it is a euphemism for “a personal part of the male anatomy.” Depending on the Chinese dialect and the way it is accented, it can be anything from “please” to a polite greeting to complete gibberish.

I have to assume that the restaurant was named after one of the Chinese meanings, though they refer to their style as “Asian,” and offer sushi as well as

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Younger Demographics Help to Evolve Trends in the Food and Beverage Market

The MarketWatch News Department was not involved in the creation of this content.

NEW YORK, Oct. 2, 2020 /PRNewswire via COMTEX/ —
NEW YORK, Oct. 2, 2020 /PRNewswire/ — The food & beverage industry is being profoundly impacted by the global pandemic. The duration of the viral outbreak remains a key factor in assessing the overall impact of the pandemic and the overall economy as well as this industry. Now, businesses have started to slowly open up and the rapidly transforming food service industry is of great importance to the adoption of technologies for better and more efficient operations. With the addition of scheduling software, digital inventory tracking, automated purchasing tools, and digital reservation table management, the food service industry has seen huge leaps in terms of revenue generation, inventory management, customer satisfaction, and operation efficiency.

Now, the food & beverage industry has become even more important for the fast-casual

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