What’s The Difference Between Chow Mein And Lo Mein?

Noodles, veggies, and protein: These are the three components in any classic chow or lo mein. Although they may have similar ingredients, and are both delicious and popular in Chinese American restaurants across the country, they are not the same dish. “I think they became prominent on Chinese American menus because early Cantonese immigrants brought these dishes over,” said Maggie Zhu, author of the Omnivore’s Cookbook. She has developed recipes of both dishes, and explained the difference between them thusly.

chow mein, lo mein

Lo mein is on the right. chow mein is on the left.

Let’s start with the noodles.

“For me the key difference is the type of noodles used in them,” Maggie said. “Lo mein usually uses the fat, chewy noodles, while chow mein uses the thin type of noodles that sometimes contain egg.” Lo mein uses fresh noodles that are boiled for a few minutes, while chow mein uses

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What’s the Difference Between These Noodle Dishes?

While some American Chinese food menus consider chow mein and lo mein synonymous, they’re two distinct foods, thanks to their cooking methods. Here’s how to differentiate between the popular dishes the next time you want to enjoy a plate of savory, slurpable noodles.

Chow mein vs. lo mein: What is the difference?

Both of these noodle dishes are Chinese in origin and made with egg noodles (plus a combination of vegetables and sometimes meat or seafood), but their similarities stop there. Chow mein, or chāu-mèn, translates to stir-fried noodles. Lo mein, lāo miàn, means stirred noodles. So, the biggest difference is in how they’re cooked.

What type of noodles are used in each dish?

Chow mein and lo mein are both made with egg noodles, which contain wheat flour and eggs, just like Italian pasta. Lo mein is best made with fresh noodles, and chow mein can be

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