Loro Gives A Master Class on Blending Asian and Barbecue

It’s a risky business these days to fuse styles of food. In these prickly times, what seems like the harmless blending of cooking techniques and styles can easily blow up. Make a misstep or show disrespect, and what used to be called “fusion cuisine” becomes “cultural appropriation.”

So, maybe it takes a lot of guts in 2021 to open up Loro, a place that calls itself an “Asian Smokehouse & Bar.” Borrowing flavors and styles from the East and Texas barbecue to create a menu? Texans don’t like being messed with, and that goes double when it comes to their barbecue. But perhaps the larger risk is seeing two white male chefs bring an “Asian Smokehouse” concept from Austin to Dallas. Recent history here shows how quickly tempers can flare.

For example, last year’s social media feud between Mot Hai Ba’s chef Peja Krstic and several Vietnamese American women

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Savor: Hill Center’s Long Lunch Cooking Class

Hill Center’s Long Lunch Cooking Class: Paella

For many years now, the Hill Center in the Old Naval Hospital has served as a go-to source for those looking to boost their culinary skills, starting at the most basic or remedial level, with the regularly presented “Kitchen 101: Introduction to Cooking Series.”

However, the small team of experienced chefs and bakers the nonprofit organization relies on for its culinary programming also regularly whips up new and niche ideas intended for the more advanced home chef, particularly those who are culinary adventure-seekers.


As an example of classes designed with internationally inspired intermediate home cooks in mind, look no further than the four-part “Long Lunch” series that Chef Mark Haskell, a longtime Hill Center cooking teacher, will lead in February over Zoom.

Styled as a sample of global street food, one that “will take you on a tour of the back alleys

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Kayabuki class and winter canoeing: a guide to sustainable travel in Japan | Japan untold

The Roots sustainability programme teaches traditional building methods.




The Roots sustainability programme teaches traditional building methods.
Photograph: Yuri Kobayashi

Learn traditional building methods in the Keihoku mountains, Kyoto
Based in the bucolic, mountainous Keihoku area in north-west Kyoto, the Roots sustainability programme offers multi-day educational tours to groups, with an emphasis on connecting to nature, sustainability, and immersion in local culture.

Each bespoke tour is structured around a central project and interspersed with other (optional) experiences such as hiking, rice planting and craft workshop visits. You might, for instance, learn the art of kayabuki (thatching with pampas grass) from an expert, process typhoon-damaged timber in a cedar forest, and then build a treehouse under the guidance of a local lumberjack, carpenter and treehouse “master”. These crafts have been given a boost by the fact that traditional Japanese kominka architecture belatedly gained Unesco Intangible Cultural Heritage status in December 2020.

From £914pp from six nights based on a group

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