Boston has a long tradition of Asian women chefs and restaurateurs. Here are eight standout businesses to support

Neither has its restaurant community. Asia Mei, chef-owner of Moonshine 152 in South Boston, says she felt the climate grow more threatening last year around St. Patrick’s Day. “We were starting to get a lot of racist, threatening, xenophobic calls; [comments on] Facebook and community bulletin boards; things from strangers; things from people honestly you would have never thought would have said something like that. At the base of my heart, I know it’s fear and misunderstanding. I can take it because I’m tough, but at the same time, it doesn’t make it right,” she says. “It seems shocking that we aren’t more vigilant of how to empathize with each other, how to look out for each other.”

Mei is part of a long tradition of strong, successful Asian women chefs and restaurateurs in the Boston area, dating back at least as far as 1958, when Joyce Chen served Peking

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A New Restaurant Model in Philadelphia Is Helping Independent Chefs Thrive

Kampar Kitchen Food

Kampar Kitchen Food

Mike Prince Soul Food by Joy Parham.

“Why don’t you just sell pizza or sandwiches?” Ange Branca has been asked the question more than once, by landlords or well-meaning chefs trying to advise her on how to cover rent payments or raise profits.

Branca and her husband, John Branca, opened Saté Kampar on Philadelphia’s East Passyunk Avenue in 2016. Within the first year, the Malaysian restaurant inspired by her childhood in Kuala Lumpur was nominated for a James Beard Award and garnered a loyal customer base. But when they had a dispute with their landlord over a rent increase just a few months into the pandemic, the Brancas decided to close up shop. Instead of taking a break, though, they continued working, serving frontline workers and hosting pop-ups.

As they fed the community throughout the summer, Branca saw other restaurants starting to shutter—Filipino food stall Lalo

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We Have the Recipe for a Michelin-Starred Chef’s Seafood Dumplings

In the long, long list of food we’ve craved over the past 12 months, Brandon Jew’s entire Michelin-starred menu has remained stubbornly front of mind. Now, thanks to the release, earlier this week, of his new cookbook — Mister Jiu’s in Chinatown: Recipes and Stories from the Birthplace of Chinese American Food — there’s the slight (extremely slight but definitely non-zero) chance that we’ll be able to replicate at least parts of it at home.

Here, Jew shares his recipe for seafood shui jiao, his exceptional dumplings. Obviously, we went straight to the source for tips on how not to screw this up.

“When making dumplings, test one before making a whole batch,” Jew says. “A double check to ensure you are happy with the results is useful in thinking through the rest of the dish.” Another advisory for the fast-moving home chef: “The other tip I’d say is to

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A Chat With Food Critics, Chefs And Restaurateurs From Asia

I gather my friends – Asian food writers, food critics, restaurateurs and chefs – asking them why they think Chinese food comes with such a bad reputation – ultimately being the poster child of ‘dirty’.

With hundreds of Chinese restaurants closed in this pandemic year, perhaps it is more timely than ever to ask the question – can Chinese food ever be seen as ‘fine-dining’ and will America lose its love/hate relationship with Chinese food with all these closures?

Let’s not forget Chinese-American cuisine is very much a part of the American culture as is BBQ to Southerners and bagels to New Yorkers Chinese Food is definitely a highly lucrative industry. 

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