Meet Andre Chiang, the celebrity chef who gave up his Michelin stars in Singapore and moved back to Taiwan to train the next generation of chefs

Chef Andre Chiang laughing in the kitchen of his Singapore restaurant

Chiang in the kitchen of Restaurant Andre. Courtesy Netflix

  • André Chiang is the only Chinese-born chef listed in the World’s Best 50 Restaurants.

  • His Netflix film, “André and His Olive Tree,” is the top-grossing documentary in Taiwan for 2021.

  • He’s now devoting himself to shaping the next generation of young chefs in Taiwan.

  • Visit Insider’s homepage for more stories.

At Restaurant André in Singapore, nothing was left to chance, and nothing was out of place.

The menus were hardback novels inscribed with Chef Chiang’s sketches. Chairs were placed at a perfect 45-degree angle to the table. Dishes were presented in line with Chiang’s trademark Octaphilosophy and represented his chosen eight elements of food: texture, memory, pure, terroir, unique, salt, south, and artisan. Food lovers from as far away as Germany and Brazil would fly to Singapore for a taste of Restaurant André’s S$450 ($333) degustation menu.

In the

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The Chef Who Led a Global Dining Empire Sets Out on His Own in San Francisco’s Chinatown

Before it became known as a nightlife brand associated with globetrotting DJs and elaborate bottle-service presentations, Hakkasan was a global pioneer of contemporary Asian food. Ho Chee Boon, who was Hakkasan’s international executive chef, opened restaurants for the high-end hospitality group in London, Moscow, Bangkok, New York, San Francisco and beyond. Under Ho’s leadership, Hakkasan restaurants earned Michelin stars in both London and New York.

Now in 2021, a year that’s seen hospitality behemoth Tao Group acquire Hakkasan (which closed its New York and San Francisco restaurants in 2020), the Malaysian-born Ho is writing his own path at a new buzzworthy restaurant in San Francisco. On June 18, Ho will open Empress by Boon with modern Cantonese food at the former location of Chinatown’s iconic Empress of China restaurant.

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“I was fortunate to visit San Francisco for the first time 10 years ago as we

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Meet the Asian American chef behind Huntsville’s hottest food truck

Prepare to have your perception of hotdogs remixed and elevated. The tubular processed meat is primarily associated with dadbod summer cookout fare, and beer-absorbing ballast at stadium sports and arena concerts. In Albert Toh’s hands though, the hotdog is a vessel of culinary creativity and vision. And f—ing delicious.

Toh is the owner and chef behind New South Hotdog & Sushi, Huntsville’s hottest food truck. By transposing sushi’s flash presentation and vibrant supporting ingredients to hotdogs, plus offering well-executed sushi rolls too, New South does what the best food trucks tend to do: Give punters tasty and interesting food that no one else (or at least no one else in that market) does.

At local events they work, New South often commands camping-out-for-Stones-tickets-in-’89 length queues. Such was the case at Panoply Festival of the Arts back in April. Alas, other work stuff beckoned. A few weeks later, I

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How Chef Jordan Andino defines Filipino food

Every culture has its own unique flavors and cooking techniques that combine to make delicious regional cuisine. But food in the Philippines is a sprawling collection of influence and ingredients from neighboring countries that results in a harmoniously blended cuisine.

For one of the nation’s leading Filipino chefs, Jordan Andino combined his successes in professional kitchens and seized an opportunity to introduce America to the real flavors of his heritage.

PHOTO: Owner and chef Jordan Andino enjoys a dish from the menu at Flip Sigi. (Flip Sigi)

PHOTO: Owner and chef Jordan Andino enjoys a dish from the menu at Flip Sigi. (Flip Sigi)

“Whenever people talk about Filipino food, it’s ambiguous. A lot of people don’t know what it is,” he told “Good Morning America.” “It ranges from fried food to braises to anything over rice. It’s hard to kind of put in a nutshell because it’s an amalgamation of three different countries: China, Spain, and then of course the U.S.”

“In short,”

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