The California Report Magazine | KQED

Listen to this and more in-depth storytelling by subscribing to The California Report Magazine podcast.

This week, we’re bringing you some of our favorite stories from the award-winning series California Foodways. Since 2014, Lisa Morehouse has reported about the unexpected ways food plays a role in our lives, and in the history of California.  

We’re headed to the Imperial Valley, on both sides of the US/Mexico border. If you ask people in the city of Mexicali, Mexico about their most notable regional cuisine, they won’t say street tacos or mole, They’ll say Chinese food.  Above the border, the population’s mostly Latino, but Chinese restaurants are super popular, too. And that’s where you’ll eat some dishes you won’t find anywhere else.

What do E-40,  Saweetie and Kenny Rogers have in common?  They’ve all parlayed their fame to sell food, in restaurants and chains.  Now, how many celebrity restaurateurs can actually cook?

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Our Favorite Stories from California Foodways

Listen to this and more in-depth storytelling by subscribing to The California Report Magazine podcast.

This week, we’re bringing you some of our favorite stories from the award-winning series California Foodways. Since 2014, Lisa Morehouse has reported about the unexpected ways food plays a role in our lives, and in the history of California.  

We’re headed to the Imperial Valley, on both sides of the US/Mexico border. If you ask people in the city of Mexicali, Mexico about their most notable regional cuisine, they won’t say street tacos or mole, They’ll say Chinese food.  Above the border, the population’s mostly Latino, but Chinese restaurants are super popular, too. And that’s where you’ll eat some dishes you won’t find anywhere else.

What do E-40,  Saweetie and Kenny Rogers have in common?  They’ve all parlayed their fame to sell food, in restaurants and chains.  Now, how many celebrity restaurateurs can actually cook?

Read More

L.A.’s main Chinese drag awaits California COVID reopening

As California prepared to fully reopen, business at YungHo, a Taiwanese breakfast cafe on Valley Boulevard in San Gabriel, was almost back to normal.

Customers streamed in to pick up fried turnip cakes, rice porridge and youtiao, a churro-like fried dough, to go. A science teacher placed a large order of black sesame mochi and warm soy milk to celebrate her last Zoom class.

But the phone constantly rang with people asking questions that hinted at the upheaval of the last year: “Are you open for indoor dining?” “What items are still on the menu?”

Manager Andrew Zhang gives change to a customer at YungHo cafe.

Manager Andrew Zhang gives change to a customer at YungHo, a Taiwanese breakfast spot on Valley Boulevard in San Gabriel.

(Dania Maxwell / Los Angeles Times)

In the early days of the COVID-19 pandemic, Valley Boulevard was a “complete ghost town,” the cafe’s manager, Andrew Zhang, recalled.

As vaccinations picked up and case counts

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Rising Beef Prices Squeeze Carnivores From Buenos Aires to California | Investing News

By Agustin Geist, Tom Polansek and Ana Mano

BUENOS AIRES/CHICAGO/SAO PAULO (Reuters) – Beef prices are surging worldwide, taking meat off the menu in steak-loving Buenos Aires and spoiling summer barbecues in the United States as Chinese imports rise and the cost of feeding cattle soars.

Globally, the surge is contributing to the highest food prices since 2014, according to the United Nations food agency, hitting poorer consumers particularly hard as they struggle to recover from economic shutdowns triggered by the COVID-19 pandemic.

The rise in beef prices has been spurred by increasing demand from China, limited cattle supplies in some countries, a shortage of slaughterhouse workers and rising feed costs. The trend is starting to rattle supplier markets and impact policy.

Argentina, the second-biggest beef supplier to China after Brazil, on May 17 halted exports for a month as it grapples with runaway inflation. It blamed high demand from

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