Boston has a long tradition of Asian women chefs and restaurateurs. Here are eight standout businesses to support

Neither has its restaurant community. Asia Mei, chef-owner of Moonshine 152 in South Boston, says she felt the climate grow more threatening last year around St. Patrick’s Day. “We were starting to get a lot of racist, threatening, xenophobic calls; [comments on] Facebook and community bulletin boards; things from strangers; things from people honestly you would have never thought would have said something like that. At the base of my heart, I know it’s fear and misunderstanding. I can take it because I’m tough, but at the same time, it doesn’t make it right,” she says. “It seems shocking that we aren’t more vigilant of how to empathize with each other, how to look out for each other.”

Mei is part of a long tradition of strong, successful Asian women chefs and restaurateurs in the Boston area, dating back at least as far as 1958, when Joyce Chen served Peking

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How to Support the Asian American Community Right Now | FN Dish – Behind-the-Scenes, Food Trends, and Best Recipes : Food Network

Edited by Margaret Wong & T.K. Brady

In February 2020, before the COVID-19 pandemic officially locked down the U.S., UB Preserv’s chef de cuisine Nick Wong of Houston, Texas received an odd reservation cancellation.

“We got a call on Valentine’s Day about somebody wanting to cancel Easter brunch with us, citing coronavirus. The reason was a shock to me, because none of the other major restaurants in the area fielded any calls about reservations being cancelled due to coronavirus. And me, being a Chinese-American head chef of this restaurant with a somewhat Asian menu — it was just terrible.”

And just days before national shelter-in-place laws went into effect, Asian Pacific Policy and Planning Council executive director Manjusha Kulkarni found herself at a salon seated next to two women loudly discussing the “kind of food” Asians eat, and making false claims that Asian Americans brought COVID-19 to the

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Lido Chinese Restaurant to close after 30 years in OKC Asian District

The rumors are true: Lido Chinese Restaurant, 2518 Military Dr., will close next week when March ends. 

Much to the chagrin of my esteemed colleague Steve Lackmeyer, the 30-year-old restaurant that helped build the Asian District as we know it today is packing up its wonton soup, it’s claypots and vermicelli bowls and calling it a career.

Since December, rumors have swirled around social media about the future of the restaurant. Owner Eric Ly spoke with me briefly last week and confirmed he planned to close at month’s end.

“It’s time,” he said. “Thirty years is a long time.”

More coverageHow an OKC Mediterranean restaurant survived despite COVID-19: Limited hours ‘helped us’

Affects of COVID

A yearlong pandemic certainly took a toll, and frozen underground pipes earlier this year that disrupted service did not help. 

I’d hoped to sit down with Eric for a longer interview, but his

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What is Umamicart? This company is changing Asian grocery shopping

Andrea Xu always found it difficult to find all the Chinese ingredients she wanted to cook with in grocery stores and markets. So, earlier this month, the 28-year-old launched a streamlined online grocery service called Umamicart with hundreds of Asian products all in one place.

Growing up in Spain with Chinese immigrant parents who owned and operated a Chinese restaurant, Xu was used to enjoying her family’s cuisine at home. But out at Madrid’s markets, it was nearly impossible to find the products she craved.

“My parents served Chinese food, but they had to conform to what is it considered Chinese food in Spain, they had to have certain things on the menu,” Xu told TODAY Food. “For Umamicart, I wanted to create something that’s not determined by something else. Getting rid of that undo definition is part of this.”

Andrea Xu as a girl with her mom
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