Bertie A. Kinser

Genevieve Ko talks dim sum and Mexican food in the San Gabriel Valley

I became a fan of Genevieve Ko a few years ago when I received a copy of her 2016 baking masterwork, “Better Baking,” as a holiday gift.

I learned many important lessons from that book — the value of investing in a good rimmed baking sheet, for one — and return often to its simple yet profound premise, which is rooted in the idea that minimally processed ingredients, used intelligently, can deepen the flavor of something as familiar as a peanut butter cookie, and make you long for a chocolate sheet cake made using, of all things, creamy sweet potatoes.

Before joining L.A. Times Food as cooking editor nearly two years ago, Genevieve worked as an editor at Martha Stewart Living and Gourmet, among other publications, and has co-authored several well-known cookbooks, including George Mendes’ “My Portugal,” Carla Hall’s “Soul Food” and multiple titles with French American chef

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Food from everywhere, and nowhere [restaurant review]



 Richard Foss

Chin Chin offers an American vision of Asian flavors

Chin Chin manager George Armenta with his popular Chinese chicken salad. Photos by JP Codero

Before naming any business, you probably ought to investigate what it means in different languages. Chin Chin on Rosecrans is an example. In diplomatic English it’s slang for small talk at parties, in Italian it’s a toast celebrating health, in Nigeria it’s a kind of fried cookie, and in Japan it is a euphemism for “a personal part of the male anatomy.” Depending on the Chinese dialect and the way it is accented, it can be anything from “please” to a polite greeting to complete gibberish.

I have to assume that the restaurant was named after one of the Chinese meanings, though they refer to their style as “Asian,” and offer sushi as well as

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Taco Bell fans are extremely jealous after learning about the chain’s ‘wy’ Chinese version

For many fast food lovers, the words “Taco Bell” and “fine dining” are basically antonyms. In China, things are a little different.

Taco Bell is a newcomer to the world’s most populous country. According to the New York Times, the chain’s current Chinese version began opening in major cities in 2017.

That explains why many in the U.S. are just now catching on. Thanks to video by TikToker Yusen Zhang, Americans are finding out just how different — and how “high end” — Taco Bell can get in China.

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In his viral clip, Zhang tours a location in Shanghai. Once inside, he finds modern decorations, a stylish seating area and an open kitchen where customers can watch their order come together.

He then proceeds to explore the menu, which features plenty of unique items. One notable

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Outdoor dining, heat lamps: Restaurants survive COVID-19

Tamara Holmes, Special to USA TODAY
Published 5:00 a.m. ET Oct. 5, 2020 | Updated 10:27 a.m. ET Oct. 5, 2020

In a year when thousands of restaurants have closed and many more are struggling to hang on, Bar Bombón in Philadelphia currently is enjoying sales 5% to 10% above last year’s levels. 

It’s a far cry from March when the mayor said all restaurants had to close to slow the spread of COVID-19.

“It was like a gauntlet came down,” says Bar Bombón owner Nicole Marquis recalling the announcement. Her full-service vegan restaurant offers plant-based Latin American favorites such as tacos and empanadas.

With Bar Bombón restricted to takeout and delivery orders, sales fell by the end of March to 10% of normal revenue levels. Yet, remarkably the restaurant is currently exceeding last year’s revenue, despite the fact that indoor dining just began in Philadelphia at 25% capacity in

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